Ideas on Europe

Informed analysis, comment and debate

Category Archives: Law & Justice

Who holds the responsibility to protect? And who is to be protected?

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Lucke Glanville argues in his recent Sovereignty and the Responsibility to Protect (2014) that this responsibility dates back from the 16th and 17th centuries. However, a good number of scholars believe that the first “humanitarian intervention” took place in Bulgaria in 1876, when Ottoman troops attacked villages killing thousands of civilians. Outraged, the British public […]

What human rights norms do Western European countries promote?

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William Hague and Angelina Jolie are hosting a global summit in London to put an end to sexual violence in conflict (follow #TimeToAct). In June 2013, Madrid hosted the 5th world conference on (against) death penalty. It was organised by an abolitionist group (ECPM), and sponsored by the Governments of Spain, France, Switzerland and Norway. […]

When could I start considering the possibility of anti-homeless spikes?

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These spikes were installed in the entrance of a luxury block of flats in South London. Somebody took the picture and sparked a rapid reaction on social media. Both the local Council and the Mayor of London urged the owners to remove them as soon as possible. I don’t know if they are still there. […]

The European Human Rights system

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Today we’ll focus on the evolution of the European system, with a brief overview of its key institutions and the composition, structure, and functions of the European court. And we’ll also review in brief, some of the Court’s key achievements, and some of the potential risks of its success. Let’s begin with a brief overview of the Council of Europe and the European Convention on Human Rights. […]

Are the Treaties more integrationist than their Masters?

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In defence of my proposed inter-pillar tie-breaker, I remarked that the Treaties have a tendency of being more integrationist – i.e. more inclined towards strengthening European integration – than the Member States, even though the Member States are supposed to be the Maîtres des Traités, the Masters of the Treaties. So I started to wonder: […]

The rise of little activism: Farage to be prosecuted by MEP candidate

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To be a doctor by profession and leave it aside in order to become an overnight group activist street-beating with no professional tools and a rather amateurish cause is both touching and insane.  This is what the leader of a newly created political formation, the Europeans Party, Tommy Tomescu is doing. In the past few days he has managed to get himself booked […]

On Border of Ethics and Politics – Discourses on Truth and Censorship in Plato’s “Politeia” Compared with Today’s Internet Regulation

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On the 9th of May 2014 I presented a Paper at the Conference on Freedom of Expression held at the University of Helsinki from 7 to 9 May 2014. Inspired by Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), I was trying to combine substantial rights and their constraints, ethics and politics, discourses […]

Posted in Law & Justice, Politics & Public Policy, The EU | Comments Off on On Border of Ethics and Politics – Discourses on Truth and Censorship in Plato’s “Politeia” Compared with Today’s Internet Regulation

Is it blue or is it a car?

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Is it blue or is it a car? This may seem like a strange question, but it is exactly the kind of question that the European Court of Justice was faced with in yesterday’s Commission v. Parliament and Council (Cross-border exchange of information on road safety related traffic offences): Is Directive 2011/82 facilitating the cross-border […]

The EU’s Impotence on all Things Except Economic Diplomacy

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The recent case on the annexation of Crimea and the EU’s flaccid non-response, at least militarily, highlights the relative impotence of the EU in matters of “high politics”. Should onlookers be surprised by such an emasculation on the part of the EU? It is worth considering that the EU first started out as the European […]

Hakamada Iwao Released from Death Row after 46 Years

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On the 27 March 2014, Hakamada Iwao, a former boxer, was released from death row having been there for 46 years since 1968. He has consistently stated that he was forced to confess to the murder of a family of four in 1966. However, until this date, his appeals for retrial had been rejected by […]

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