Ideas on Europe

Informed analysis, comment and debate

Responsible University: Exploring the Nordic Context a [...]

What is the ‘responsible university’? What does it mean for universities to address the Sustainable Development Goals? And what is specific about universities in the Nordic countries? These are some of the questions addressed in a new book ‘Responsible University: Exploring the Nordic Context and Beyond’, edited by Mads P. Sørensen (Aarhus University, Denmark), Lars […]

Conducting EU foreign policy in times of crises and dissent

In the last decade, dissent among EU member states about the EU’s fundamental values has increased as a result of some national governments’ refusal to implement decisions and consent to previously agreed policy on issues related to human rights, rule of law and migration.

Operational overlap between the EU and NATO: An empir [...]

The EU and NATO crisis response operations have been widely debated from a division of labour perspective. For some scholars, there has been a de facto partition of work between these operations, as NATO focuses on the higher intensity tasks of peace enforcement and peacekeeping while EU is mainly involved in the lower end of conflict prevention and post-conflict management.

Latest posts from all blogs

What the Pandemic could mean for the EU

EU Priorities | | 1 comment

Will it bring nations closer together or pull them apart? The Financial Times commentator, Martin Wolf, has wrote an article on March 24th entitled the Pandemic is an Ethical Challenge. There seems little doubt that it will change the world fundamentally affecting every other issue, rivalries and conflicts, the role of governments, the role of […]

Britain’s Zen approach to dealing with Brussels

Ideas on Europe |

The government’s approach to building a post-Brexit trade policy appears based on Zen philosophy rather than economics. In economics textbooks, trade is a two-handed exchange between two people, an exporter and an importer, and one of these is foreign.

Recent

Is there a case for not extending transition?

PoliticsatSurrey, Simon Usherwood |

As much as people talk about Brexit at all right now, much of what you hear is the cry that an extension of the Withdrawal Agreement’s transition period must happen. I’ve not seen a single industry representative, negotiation expert or academic say anything different for the past month, and I’m not about to go against […]

Some false claims and a lesson from the EU referendum

Sebastien Pant |

My last post dates back to early 2016 when I wrote about the risks of David Cameron sleepwalking us towards Brexit. The cataclysm happened. And it then took an agonising four more years of tortuous debate for the UK to actually leave the European Union. Friendships were left strained, relationships broken, investment stalled, and our […]

Promise of democratic renewal or shaky idea? Recommendations for the Conference on the Future of Europe

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Can participatory democracy be the solution to the EU’s democratic deficit? This seems to be the European Commission’s intention with launching the Conference on the Future of Europe. If this is to work, the Conference must however itself be democratically legitimate. Based on past experiences, Camille Dobler gives four recommendations for citizens’ consultations. Can participatory […]

Do we know what our concepts do in our analyses?

JCMS |

Within the social sciences, there is an increasing interest in the ways in which the theoretical concepts employed in research and politics contribute to making the objects they are studying.

The Unintended Consequences of Brexit: Sinn Féin’s New Look and the Feasibility of a United Ireland

Associate Professor Daniela Irrera | | 1 comment

The general elections held in Ireland on 8 February 2020, have witnessed the decrease of traditional parties’ electoral support and the rise of Sinn Féin, the left-wing party and former political wing of the IRA. Rather than being another populist phenomenon in Europe, this unusual (but not unexpected) victory could bring about more interesting developments […]

The euro: scapegoated by politicians, supported by the public

Joris Melman |

Public opinion has a central role in the politics of the Eurozone. But how do citizens form their opinions? Joris Melman’s original research indicates that opinions on the euro are often embedded in more general political orientations. For most people, the euro is above all a practical artefact in their daily lives, which makes them […]

Divertimenti I

PoliticsatSurrey, Simon Usherwood |

As many better scholars than me have noted, it’s hard not to get caught up in a social panic. Just I’ve written many posts about “why is anyone thinking about anything but Brexit?”, so I now get to read endless materials about how coronavirus is the only thing that matters. Yesterday’s budget is a case […]

Fade to meh

PoliticsatSurrey, Simon Usherwood |

Maybe it’s the coronavirus, maybe it’s the floods, maybe it’s the excitement around the Prime Minister’s engagement/child-to-be, but we seem to have largely given up talking about Brexit any more. Sure, there’s debate if you want it, tucked away in the Westminster/Brussels bubble and deep in the inside sections of the paper, but it’s a […]

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