Ideas on Europe

Informed analysis, comment and debate

Category Archives: Global & International

Higher education: regional, global and international

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On 9 and 10 July 2018, Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU Singapore) hosted three seminars on higher education issues at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Speaking on ‘What does comparative regionalism offer to higher education research?’, Pauline Ravinet (University of Lille) and Meng-Hsuan Chou introduced the concept of ‘higher education regionalism’, a heuristic framework to examine regional cooperation […]

Announcing the Routledge Handbook of Translation and Activism

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Translation studies is increasingly expanding its disciplinary range. A volume I am editing together with my colleague Kayvan Tahmasebian, the Routledge Handbook of Translation and Activism, seeks to facilitate this expansion. This volume, which will be included in Routledge’s exciting series of handbooks on translation, will survey the state-of-the-art within translation studies, while opening the field […]

Politics of big science, large-scale research facilities and international research collaboration

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Isabel K. Bolliger, Katharina Cramer, David Eggleton, Olof Hallonsten, Maria Moskovko, Nicolas Rüffin[i] We are witnessing the emergence of ‘grand challenges’ impacting societies on a global scale. These include climate change, artificial intelligence, and access to resources. Large-scale research and internationally coordinated collaboration in science, technology and innovation (STI) policy are viewed as the means […]

Welcome from the Editors

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Almost a year into our editorship of JCMS, we are very proud to launch our official blog. The purpose of the blog is to facilitate the space for debate on issues of academic importance and policy relevance in European and comparative regionalism studies. As we stated in our editorial note a couple of months ago, […]

Mr Macron goes to Germany

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After being busy getting elected in May 2017, Emmanuel Macron used the traditionel French ‘Bridges of May‘ in 2018 to take a trip to Aachen in order to accept the so-called ‘Charlemagne Prize’ that the city bestows each year on a prominent individual ‘for work done in the service of European unification’. Some might argue […]

Science diplomacy – a catch-all concept in public policy?

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Nicolas Rüffin Science diplomacy has attracted a lot of attention during the last decade. Actors as different as the US State Department, the European Commission, the Royal Society, UNESCO and a great many of other intermediary organizations have adopted the term to rebrand their activities, programs, and agendas. The contexts in which the term science […]

Improved coordination of research infrastructures policies in Europe

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Isabel K. Bolliger, Alexandra Griffiths and Martin Müller In 2000 the European Commission (EC) launched the European Research Area (ERA) initiative, with the intention to improve coordination and collaboration in research and innovation in Europe. ERA became a key element of the ambitious Lisbon strategy in order for the EU “to become the most competitive […]

Italy before the elections: sliding slowly, eyes wide open, into durable decline?

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On the 4th of March the election for the next mandate of the Italian Parliament will take place, and once more the political scenario in Italy appears to be chaotic and poor at the same time. Is it because they know that Italian citizens are so tired of politics that certain political parties do not […]

Outside the EU, we lose a say and a vote

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Next year, the UK will be the only EU member ever to leave. No other countries are leaving. On the contrary, more countries are queuing to join. In the EU, Britain and Britons have a say and a vote on the running and the future direction of our continent. Every five years, we’ve been able […]

Critical European Studies Need More Than Foucault

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How can we create spaces for critical discussion about the European Union? Vanessa Bilancetti writes in response to Rachael Dickson Hillyard’s article on alternative approaches to EU Studies. Through her own research on institutional responses to the economic crisis, Vanessa Bilancetti identifies dissenting voices that can enrich an ongoing debate. I have read with interest […]

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