Ideas on Europe

Informed analysis, comment and debate

Category Archives: Law & Justice

Private Use

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Last month, AG Cruz-Villlalon published his opinion in the case about the Dutch thuiskopieerheffing, the levy on writable media for the purposes of compensating copyrights holders for legal and illegal private use copying. While the opinion is probably correct, I think there is something very very wrong with it. (The opinion isn’t currently available in […]

Market elements in universities: Potential conflict with EU competition law?

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Education and research policy have developed at the European level over recent decades. In particular the Bologna Process and the Lisbon/Europe 2020 Strategy have played a significant role.[i] If one, however, examines the actual competences to create legislation for these policy matters at EU level, one finds that these are limited. The EU has only […]

Ruggie versus Ecuador: Will a human rights norm ever emerge regardless of Western support?

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In September 2013, a number of countries issued a joint statement in favour of an international treaty on business and human rights. The statement was drafted by Ecuador and signed also by the African Group, the Arab Group, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Kyrgyzstan, Cuba, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Venezuela and Peru. These countries believe that a legally binding […]

Evader’s choice: Why tighter environmental implementation rules drive legislative fatigue and policy dismantling

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EU environmental action programmes set the priorities for EU environmental policy. After the 5th programme (1992-2000), which focused on sustainability,[1] the 6th programme (2002-2012) stressed the need for better implementation and the better environmental policy integration in other policy areas.[2] Adopted in November 2013, the new 7th action programme (2013-2020) focuses once again on implementation.[3] […]

EU Member State Building in the Western Balkans

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In this article, Soeren Keil looks at the EU’s more active role in the process of state (and nation) building in the countries of the former Yugoslavia. He argues that the EU’s technical approach to highly political issues has led to misconceptions between the EU and elites in these countries, and has in turn alienated citizens. He lastly offers some ideas as to how the EU might change its approach to enlargement to meet these challenges.

Rights as Democracy? A short response to Bellamy

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Last week a few members of King’s College London held the first session of our reading group on Law and Social Sciences. We discussed Richard Bellamy’s “Rights as Democracy” (2012), and we also read Isaiah Berlin’s seminal “Two Concepts of Liberty” (1958) with Skinner’s critique, “A Third Concept of Liberty” (2002). In his article, Bellamy […]

Ferries & Competition – Appendix

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Good news: In the Terschelling Ferries case that I blogged about on Monday, EVT won on appeal! The Court of Appeals in The Hague ruled today that EVT gets to continue to operate between Harlingen and Terschelling for the time being. (A new regulatory scheme is currently the subject of parallel litigation. Don’t ask.)   Competition Law As […]

Competition Law, Sustainability and Geography

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The Ferry post raised an interesting issue that I’d only casually discussed elsewhere: if we are going to weigh the damage done by collusion against one or more associated benefits, which benefits for which consumers do we get to include? Inconveniently, it seems like the answer is benefits for the same set of individuals who […]

Ferries & Competition

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Recently, the District Court in The Hague tackled an interesting case about competition between ferry companies. While some of the legal details make the Court’s decision quite obviously right, the economics of the case are worth digging into a little further. Starting on 18 November 2008, a company called EVT – Eigen Veerdienst Terschelling – […]

Daily Mail: Trick or Truth? You Decide

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The Daily Mail last night refused to apologise for their story that claimed buses and planes from Romania and Bulgaria to the UK were full up and sold out, or to agree that their story was inaccurate. The world’s most popular online newspaper had reported that many Romanians and Bulgarians were coming to the UK […]

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