Ideas on Europe

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The Far-Right in International and European Law

Crossroads Europe |

Since the Second World War, the international community has sought to prevent the repetition of destructive far-right forces. Nevertheless, violent far-right entities have recently received unprecedented electoral support. In light of the current reality, a new book by UACES member Natalie Alkiviadou critically assesses the international and European tools available for States to regulate the […]

Hopes, beliefs, and concerns: narratives in German and Portuguese universities regarding Brexit

Europe of Knowledge |

Tim Seidenschnur By studying higher education as an institutional field, we focus on an area where European integration has in general been regarded as positive. However, the current period is characterized by basic disagreements among the political parties and the electorates about the preferred nature of the future European order, which causes uncertainties and tensions. […]

How do we manage knowledge? Let us count the ways

Europe of Knowledge |

Sofya Kopelyan Nothing can keep a genuine community of scholars from academic discussions – neither a malfunctioning projector, nor a shortage of sockets, nor hard chairs from the Communist times. Even more so when discussions centre on the governance of knowledge as the key to economic growth and public well-being. This year’s Knowledge Politics and […]

Why East Central Europe’s Flawed Liberals Leave Democracy Vulnerable

JCMS |

By Seán Hanley and James Dawson East European liberals’ accommodation of ethnic nationalism has left the region’s democratic institutions vulnerable The newer EU member states of East-Central Europe (ECE) were long held up as a textbook illustration of how the attractiveness of the EU’s political and economic model, backed by tough accession conditions, could keep shakier […]

Analysing Crisis Parliamentary Discourse in Greece: Who Should We Blame?

JCMS |

In a period of economic and political crisis, political rhetoric varies and blame shifting increases (Boin, Hart and McConnell, 2009).  By looking at the ‘crisis’ period in Greece (2009-2015) and the parliamentary bailout debates we argue that when it comes to ‘who should we blame’, the discourse moves towards the form of ‘historical blame shifting’, which does not only focus on blaming the external enemy but mainly blaming previous governments for colliding with the external enemy (Ladi and Tsagkroni, 2019).

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